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Stylus

From Wikipedia, Chace Audio

In the audio world, a stylus is a phonograph or gramophone needle used to play back sound on records as well as to record the sound indentations on the master record. The stylus is a crucial part of the phonograph, as it is the one part of the system that actually contacts the recorded disc and transfers its vibrations to the rest of the system.

There are two desired qualities in a stylus: first, that it faithfully follows the contours of the recorded groove and transfers the vibration to the system, and second, that it does not damage the recorded disc. Many types of styli have been utilized over the course of phonograph development. Their shape and the material they are made from varies widely depending on the mechanical or electrical system employed to record and transmit the sound as well as the composition of the final recorded discs. For example, early mechanical record players used single use, thick steel needles for styli. Styli for playing modern vinyl records are made out of Sapphire or diamond.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License found at http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html. It uses material from the Wikipedia/article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stylus#Use_in_music_recording_and_reproduction.