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Sound Design

From Chace Audio

Most of the elements of a film’s sound - dialog, naturalistic effects, music, Foley, and realistic backgrounds are recorded in a real life environment and edited into the soundtrack. Some sounds, however, do not occur in real life or would be impossible to record, and these must be “designed” for inclusion in the soundtrack.

Spaceship ambiences, laser swords, and whirling tornadoes are examples of sounds that either don’t exist, or, in the case of the tornado, would be more dramatically effective if “designed.” Natural sounds can be manipulated electronically or mixed with each other to create new sounds. Waveforms can be generated and tinkered with to create noises that do not occur naturally.

Creative mixers and editors have designed some of the most memorable sounds in film history. The next time you hear a dragon roar or a mystical power source pulse with bass-throbbing energy, try to imagine how the sound was created. You will quickly gain even greater respect for these talented craftspeople.