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Fade
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Filled
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Fx

Frame

From Chace Audio

A frame is one of the many single photographic images in a motion picture. Usually, 24 frames equal one second of time (24 frames per second fps). This rapid speed is what gives those fixed images the illusion of movement when projected on screen.

Frames occur in standard film speeds (24 or 25 fps), as well as standard video formats where two video fields are equal to one frame. Examples of video rates include: 25, 29.97 NDF, 29.97 DF, 30 NDF, etc. The broadcast standards in North America and Japan are 29.97 frames per second (NTSC) and 24 frames per second for high-definition video. 25 frames per second (PAL) is the standard for the rest of the world.

When it comes to synchronizing an audio soundtrack to picture, frames can be used to accurately measure the timing between the sound and the image. For example, if a gun fires onscreen, and that moment is locked to a specific time code (time code encompassing hours, minutes, seconds, and frames), then you can find the sound of the gun shot in your audio source and time it down to the exact frame in the film when the gun fires onscreen. Thus, perfect synchronization between audio and picture can be achieved.

A film frame contains a single photograph. Film frames, running in succession through a projector, give the illusion of moving pictures.

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