Browse by Spelling

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #

D/A Converter
D1 Video
D2 Video
DA88
DA98-HR
DASH
DAT
Data Compression
Data Migration
Datasat
DAW
dB
DBC
dBFS
DBX 700
dbx®
DCT
DD+
De-esser
Decay
Decibel
Decibels Full Scale
Decode
Degauss
Delay
DFTC
Dictaphone
Digibeta
DigiDelivery™
Digital Audio
Digital Audio Tape
Digital Audio Workstation
Digital Betacam
Digital Linear Tape
Digital Noise
Digital to Analog...
Digitization
Dipped
Distortion
Dither
DLT
DME
Dolby® "W"
Dolby® A
Dolby® B
Dolby® C
Dolby® Digital
Dolby® Digital EX™
Dolby® Digital Plus
Dolby® E
Dolby® NR
Dolby® ProLogic
Dolby® ProLogic IIx
Dolby® SR
Dolby® Stereo
Dolby® TrueHD
Doubling
Downmix
Drift
Drop-frame Time Code
Dropout
Dry
DTRS Cassette
DTS
DTS-ES
DTS-HD High-resolution...
DTS-HD Master Audio
DTS-NEO:6
DVD
Dx
Dynamic Compression
Dynamic Processing
Dynamic Range

Dynamic Compression

From Chace Audio

To compress something is to make it smaller. In dynamic terms, compression refers to shrinking the dynamic range of an audio program.

One typical application for this kind of compression is when a modern theatrical soundtrack is being repurposed for television broadcast or home video. A track with broad dynamic range - one with both quiet dialogue and loud explosions, for example - can be very effective in a large theater. The mix required for that environment allows the quiet dialogue to be intelligible and the loud explosions to be inoffensive. The same mix with the same dynamic range applied to a near-field home environment can result in the quiet dialogue becoming unintelligible and the loud explosions becoming offensive or even painful to the listener. Compression brings up the level of the quieter program and/or reduces the level of the loudest program material to better suit the playback environment.

Tags:
PROCESSING