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D/A Converter
D1 Video
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DA88
DA98-HR
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DAT
Data Compression
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Datasat
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dBFS
DBX 700
dbx®
DCT
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Decibels Full Scale
Decode
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Dictaphone
Digibeta
DigiDelivery™
Digital Audio
Digital Audio Tape
Digital Audio Workstation
Digital Betacam
Digital Linear Tape
Digital Noise
Digital to Analog...
Digitization
Dipped
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Dither
DLT
DME
Dolby® "W"
Dolby® A
Dolby® B
Dolby® C
Dolby® Digital
Dolby® Digital EX™
Dolby® Digital Plus
Dolby® E
Dolby® NR
Dolby® ProLogic
Dolby® ProLogic IIx
Dolby® SR
Dolby® Stereo
Dolby® TrueHD
Doubling
Downmix
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Drop-frame Time Code
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DTRS Cassette
DTS
DTS-ES
DTS-HD High-resolution...
DTS-HD Master Audio
DTS-NEO:6
DVD
Dx
Dynamic Compression
Dynamic Processing
Dynamic Range

Dolby® E

From Chace Audio

Dolby® E is a data reduction scheme created by Dolby Laboratories that facilitates the final delivery of soundtracks for broadcast applications. This unique process allows for up to eight separate channels of audio to be encoded and recorded onto just two channels of a deliverable. Entirely separate programs can even be embedded together and decoded again as separate tracks using this process. Usually, however, it is used to deliver multiple versions (a 5.1 and an Lt/Rt composite, for example) or multiple languages (English Lt/Rt, Latin American Spanish Lt/Rt, French Canadian Lt/Rt, and Brazilian Portuguese Lt/Rt, for example) on a single digital videotape.

Dolby E enables the broadcaster to make edits and subsequent copies of the program material for commercial insertion or syndication, even after it has been decoded. It can then be re-encoded without audible signal degradation. With other encoding schemes, such as Dolby® Digital (AC-3), it is not recommended that copies be made from the resulting streams, re-encoding a decoded stream is not recommended, and they cannot be edited easily.