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Dictaphone

From Chace Audio, Wikipedia

The Dictaphone was a personal recording device modeled after instant-cut records. The original machine, dating back to 1907, did in fact cut grooves into wax. However, rather than cutting grooves on a disc, the Dictaphone introduced by the Americaqn Dictaphone company in 1947 inscribed a groove into a flexible vinyl belt called a Dictabelt. The Dictabelt was spread between two rollers in a closed loop like a conveyer belt. It had limited plays due to the wear the stylus caused in the soft vinyl.

Every good story involves a conspiracy theory, and the Dictabelt’s story is no exception. A Dictabelt recording was made from a radio microphone stuck in the open position on a police officer's motorcycle when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963. While many aspects of his assassination have been investigated ad nauseam, the Dictabelt recording has been gaining prominence amongst conspiracy theorists. The open-microphone portion of the recording lasts 5.5 minutes, purportedly beginning about a minute after the shooting occurred at 12:34 p.m. local time. Verbal time stamps were made periodically by the police radio dispatcher and can be heard on the recording, but conspiracy theorists believe that the recording started two minutes before the shots.

Dictaphones were in widespread use in offices until the mid 1970s.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License found at http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html. It uses material from the Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictaphone and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictabelt.