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DTS-HD Master Audio

From Wikipedia

DTS-HD Master Audio, previously known as DTS++ and DTS-HD, allows for a virtually unlimited number of surround sound channels to be downmixed to 5.1 multi-channel audio and two-channel audio and can deliver audio quality at bit rates extending up to lossless (24-bit, 192kHz). DTS-HD Master Audio is selected as an optional surround sound format for Blu-ray Disc®, where it has been limited to a maximum of eight discrete channels. It supports variable bit rates up to 24.5mbps on Blu-ray, with six channels encoded up to 192kHz or eight channels encoded at 96kHz/24-bit. All Blu-ray players can decode the DTS core resolution soundtrack at 1.5mbps. However, DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby® TrueHD are the only technologies that deliver compressed lossless surround sound for this format.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License found at http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html. It uses material from the Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DTS_(sound_system).