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DTS

From Wikipedia, Chace Audio

Digital Theater Systems, Inc., based in Agoura Hills, CA, developed DTS®, a multi-channel digital surround sound format originally conceived for theatrical use and now standard in consumer grade applications such as DVD and Blu-ray® discs.

Work on the format started in 1991, with film director Steven Spielberg as one of the company's initial investors, who felt that optical theatrical sound formats had become obsolete. The first release was Spielberg's 1993 Jurassic Park. DTS's major competitors in multi-channel theatrical audio were Dolby Digital and SDDS®.

In 2008, the cinema division was divested to form DTS Digital Cinema. In 2009, DTS Digital Cinema was purchased by Beaufort International Group Plc. and became known as Datasat Digital Entertainment. In 2011, the DTS cinema branding was dropped in favor of Datasat. The original DTS, Inc. continues to develop and license DTS products for the home consumer market.

In the consumer home theater market, DTS offers several options for multi-channel playback, usually encoded at a higher bit rate than allowed for by Dolby Digital AC-3, including DTS-ES, DTS-NEO:6, DTS-HD, and DTS-HD Master Audio. The basic and most common version of the format is a 5.1 channel system similar to a Dolby® Digital setup, which encodes audio as five full-frequency channels plus a special LFE (low frequency effect) channel for the subwoofer.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License found at http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html. It uses material from the Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DTS_(sound_system).

The DTS time code track is highlighted in red in this illustration.

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Macro of 35mm film audio tracks, from left to right: Sony SDDS, Dolby® Digital, analog Optical, and DTS time code. Image courtesy of Wikipedia Commons.

35mm_film_audio_macro12.jpg