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D1 Video

From Wikipedia, Chace Audio

Developed by Sony and introduced in 1986, D1 was the first major digital video format. D1 consists of 3/4” digital videotape housed in a cassette, is capable of recording and playing back four discreet channels of 48kHz digital audio, and has an analog cue track as well as a time code channel. D1 cassettes record uncompressed component video signals as opposed to the less expensive D2 cassettes, which use uncompressed composite video.

This definition is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License found at http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html . It uses material from the Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D1_%28Sony%29 .

D1 machines play cassettes that are surprisingly large.

d1video.jpg