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Channel

From Chace Audio

In the world of post production audio, the term channel typically refers to one of two things:

1. Channel is often used when referring to audio tracks on tape, film, or in a DAW (digital audio workstation); for example: “The French composite can be found on channels three and four of the digital Betacam.”

2. Channel is often used to reference a “channel strip” on a mixing board (also called a mixing console). Mixing boards are defined by how many channels they have, i.e. a 24-channel mixing board. Each channel strip begins with an audio input and makes its way through dynamics processors (such as EQ, gates and compressors), auxiliary sends, a volume fader and finally, a router, for summing and outputting the audio signal.