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Compact Disc

(Redirected From CD)

From Chace Audio

A Compact Disc (CD) is an optical disc used to store digital data. It was originally developed to store sound recordings exclusively, but later it also allowed for the preservation of other types of data. For data storage purposes, CDs can hold up to 700 MB. Standard audio CDs can hold up to 80 minutes of audio. The digital data on a CD, as read with a laser, begins at the center of the disc and proceeds outwards to the edge.

CDs are commonly used for file sharing or back up purposes both by consumers and in the professional realm as they are lightweight, take up little storage space, are inexpensive, and easily replaceable. However, CDs aren't the best option for long-term data storage due to their limited capacity and physical weaknesses (scratches, cracks, etc.).

The standard format for an audio CD is 44.1kHz, 16-bit, holding up to 80 minutes of stereo or mono program. This is the standard for all consumer audio CDs, but it is too limiting when it comes to audio storage for post production. Most audio tracks for film and television have longer run times and take advantage of larger sample rates and bit depths.